Broke-Ass Tag: wedding booze

5/16

In light of the multitude of questions The Broke-Ass Bride has received as of late regarding alcohol and your reception, specifically how much, we’ve decided to bring back this classic post by Liz Coopersmith of Silver Charm Events. Plus, you get the bonus of etiquette surrounding inviting your office crowd!

Beer for Everyone! Seriously.                         (Courtesy of One Love Photography)

Dear Liz,

Our wedding is next weekend, and we’re providing the alcohol. We’re just serving wine and beer for 100 guests, but how much should we get?

Signed,

Bar Verklemptkeeper

Dear Bar,

More than you need. But start here: On bottle of wine per two people per hour; two beers (bottle or keg pour) per person per hour. I use Martha Stewart’s calculator, and it hasn’t let me down, yet. But let’s talk about  “hours” for a minute. Hours and ice. If you’re shutting down the bar early to assure that your guests get home alive, my recommendation is to buy enough alcohol to cover that last hour, anyway. Better to have too much than not enough. You can always return what you don’t use – ask your bartender not to open any bottles before he or she pours them.

Ice. Ice melts, which is only one of the things that drives me nuts about nature. Martha calls for one pound of ice per person per hour, but  if using for both cooling and pouring, I’d get another half pound.  Ask your bartender to go a little easy on the ice, too.

Dear Liz,

I work in an office setting and I am getting married in 42 days, I want to give out invites but I don’t want anyone to be offended if I don’t personally invite them, so I was going to just give one to the office staff as a whole rather than personal ones. What do you suggest?

Signed,

The More the Merrier

Dear Merrier,

Ooh, that sounds like a fantastic idea! Probably the best way to keep of track of who’s coming is to send out email invitations, through e-vite or pingg, or one of those. Not sure what Emily Post (or Martha) would say about that, etiquette-wise, but I’m down with it.

So, what do you peeps think? Would you send a wedding e-vite to your office guests, or give them all an individual one? Are you inviting anyone from work at all? Let’s talk about it in the comments…

See you at the end of the aisle,

christen
  • 6/28

    Got a question for Liz? Go to the contact page, and let us know what’s up!

    Alcohol. A permanent wedding accessory?

    Dear Liz,

    Our current plan is for my fiance and me to have a local celebration party with friends and my family, and a destination wedding with his much larger family.
    The hitch with the local celebration is that he and his friends are Muslim. My fiance is also a nurse and so he absolutely has no time or patience for drunken antics. My friends and family, on the other hand, are largely not of the faith, some of them are raucous Uni students, and they expect to be drinking.
    I know that having a bar that runs dry is a definite no-no, but I was wondering what the etiquette is for an alcohol-free event, if such a thing is possible? The last time such a prospect was raised it was met with derisive laughter.

    Signed,

    Where’s the Party?

    Dear Party,

    I’ve never coordinated a wedding where alcohol wasn’t served at all, but I can certainly think of a few examples where that would happen: Couple isn’t old enough to drink; an alcoholic getting married; the wedding of a  close family member of an alcoholic; and, of course, if there are religious restrictions. But it sounds like you’re going to get more flack than it’s worth, if there’s nuthin’ to drink. So, why don’t we talk about limiting the bar as opposed to nixing it. What about any of these or a doing a combo of:

    • Sticking to just beer and wine, no hard alcohol. Two choices, both of which take a while to get lit off of. Even better if you can decide how many glasses or bottles get served.
    • Forgoing a 5-6 hour party. Do a long dinner instead … 2-3 hours? Three to four? Less time for drinking, and to get out of control drunk.
    •  Keeping the bar open for a shorter period of time. Three hours as opposed to four? Two hours as opposed to three? Figure out how long you want your party to be, and make the “last call” for the bar a couple of hours before that. Sodas, water and coffee are the only drinks available once alcohol service is over.
    •  Having a Cash bar. I don’t really like this one, because it doesn’t go over very well, and it’s not particularly hospitable. That’s my personal opinion, but still. You could convert the bar into a cash bar after last call for the hosted bar, but be prepared for grumbling. It is what it is.

    The other thing to remember is that your fiance is aware of how your friends and family are,  how they behave, and what they will expect. It’s one night, you’re hosting a party. He and his friends don’t have to drink if they don’t want to. You should definitely discuss the options with him, though, and see which ones he’s the most comfortable with. Go with those.

    Anyone else out there with the same issues? Or are you not serving alcohol at your wedding? Tell me below! And, if  you want to find out a little more about me and my part of wedding world, go to www.silvercharmevents.com.

    See you at the end of the aisle,

    Liz
    Liz
  • 6/14

    Photo: Persimmon Images Dear Liz, Our wedding is next weekend, and we're providing the alcohol. We're just serving wine and beer for 100 guests, but how much should we get? Signed, Bar Verklemptkeeper Dear Bar, More than you need. But start here: On bottle of wine per two people per hour; two beers (bottle or keg pour) per person per hour. I use Martha Stewart's…

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    11/19

    Ah, yes the bar. The word alone brings a smile to your face. It's the place where the party gets pumped up, where the corks are popped and the glasses clinked, where your groomsmen can be found at any time during your wedding, and where a chunk of your reception budget is going to go to. Oops! Frowning! But let's take a look at that,…

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    4/27

    LMFAO has taught me two things: How to seamlessly mix 'n match neons and plaids, AND how to get krunk in a timely fashion.  Liquor. Booze. Sauce. Hooch. Canned heat.  Call it what you want, but at our wedding, we're serving it in shot form. Hence the shout-out to LMFAO's liquoriffic tune: "Shots." Well, wait. Back up. We won't be shelling out the shots straight…

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