Broke-Ass Tag: Budget Wedding Planner

10/30

Hiya BABs! What have you accomplished in your planning this week? Now be honest, how much of it involved Pinterest?

Pinterest can be a double-edged sword for couples planning a wedding, both your BFF and worst enemy, the coach in your corner, or your opponent about to take you down for a TKO. Arguably, social media may even be killing weddings. In today’s post, we’ll examine The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly of planning a wedding with the help of Pinterest.

10.30.15

The Good: Pinterest is a Warehouse of Wedding Inspiration

I’m sure I don’t need to tell most of you about the advantages of using Pinterest: It’s a gorgeous, centralized place to store your visual inspiration for weddings or any other project or event you’re planning — a veritable digital picture diary, if you will. House redecorating? Pinterest to the rescue! Need tips on cleaning, holiday recipes, or a DIY craft idea for homemade gifts? Pinterest has it all — and if not, you can easily add almost anything you find on the Web with the click of that little Pin It button. You can share secret boards with family, friends, or your hairstylist or wedding planner (if you’re going that route) while hiding surprises from the rest of the world. Or you can share images you find, and tag friends, like, or comment to keep others in the loop.

Pinterest Color Trends

The Bad: Pinterest Enables Indecision

Pinterest has to be one of the top purveyors of FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out), right behind glossy magazines and “reality” television shows. There’s always more to see, and the sheer quantity of pins and therefore options and ideas can seriously overload the senses. It’s easy to get lost in the “research” (legit!) and never take action, making it a perfectly unproductive distraction from the more challenging and less pleasant wedding planning tasks. (Fess up! How many pins do you have in your Stuff Imma Make Someday board?) And we’ve all seen (or even experienced … ahem!) the Pinterest fails — expectation vs. reality. DIY projects often require a degree of skill that may not be disclosed in inspiration images — especially if you don’t bother to click the link to the source page — and our optimism might overshadow reason. (“I can totally knit 150 mini-sweaters for beer bottles as favors for my wedding that’s a month away!”)

Pinterest Gowns

The Ugly: Pinterest Might Blow Your Budget … And Your Confidence

Worst of all, though, is that Pinterest can fuel neverending consumption, the longing for more, more, MORE!!! And that’s bad news for BABs planning budget weddings. You’ll put together your Wedding Inspiration Board only to see The. Most. Amazing. Wedding. Ever. on Pinterest two months later and want to change the entire thing, right down to the venue you’ve put a deposit on or the fully paid gown sitting in your closet. Guys, I’m here to tell you that this is dangerous, both for your budgets and for your sanity- – as well as the sanity of those around you.

The Solution: Moderation With Inspiration

So what’s a Pinterest-addicted BAB to do? My recommendation is to give yourself a month or three to explore Pinterest (and any other inspiration sources) to your heart’s content, then talk it over with your partner and settle on a loose design concept. With that in mind, going forward pin whatever you like — but pin ideas that don’t work with your current budget and plans to a separate Stuff I Love board. That way, you get to hold onto the idea for future inspiration without clouding your vision for your wedding, or overextending your budget trying to do All The Things. Once decisions have been made as to your main decor and functional elements, PUT DOWN THE PINTEREST AND NO ONE GETS HURT.

Limit your time on inspiration sites like Pinterest, especially once you get past the six-months-to-the-wedding mark. If you’re prone to getting FOMO and feeling badly about yourself or your wedding when you see something amazing, ditch the inspiration sites altogether, at least until after the wedding. (But really, if that stuff makes you feel terrible, I’d suggest skipping it entirely. There’s no reason to subject yourself to unnecessary sources of stress or negativity!)

If you use the safe Pinterest practices outlined above, there are plenty of hidden gems that will help you to save money while planning the next Pinterest-worthy wedding … yours!

PSSST! When you do get images of that gorgeous and creative wedding you’ve planned (and possibly built with your own two hands), we’d love to see ‘em!

  • 2/23

    8 DIY Steps to Handling a Conflict with Your Wedding Vendor

    One thing I see over and over again are couples who have issues with a vendor’s performance, and don’t quite know how to proceed. For instance, I just heard about a wedding photographer who has not delivered prints for a wedding that happened two years ago. Can you imagine?

    Here are the steps I suggest you take when you have a conflict with your vendor, and you are not yet ready to hire a wedding lawyer. Please note that these are general steps. Every case is different.

    1) Gather all of your supporting documents. Hopefully you have a contract with your vendor. This will likely be the most important document. Whether you have a contract or not, gather all of your emails, text messages and voicemails. You really want to organize whatever correspondence you have with your vendor. If you have a relevant voicemail on your phone, note that you may need to have that message officially recorded so that a court may listen to it. At the very least, be sure to transcribe it for now.

    2) Review the documents. Try to find the place where the vendor agreed to do whatever s/he did not do, or did negligently. For instance, with the wedding photographer example, you would try to find the place in the documents where the photographer agreed to deliver the photos by date “x.”

    3) Draft up a demand letter. Draft a letter, and attach all relevant documentation. Keep the letter professional, and leave your emotions out of it. Even when there is conflict, you will still catch more flies with honey than vinegar. Be polite, but firm. Be sure you clearly spell out all relevant facts in chronological order. In your concluding paragraph, specify what you want. For instance, using the above example, if you want your photographs, then specifically ask for those. If you want your money back, then ask for that.

    4) Include a response time. Give the vendor a reasonable deadline to respond to your letter. I personally, generally, like 2 weeks. Make it clear to the vendor that if the conflict is not appropriately handled, then you will proceed with contacting an attorney or filing a lawsuit.

    5) Send the letter. Send the letter via fax (yes, fax machines still exist!), or email and send a hard copy. You might also consider sending it via certified mail. You want some kind of verification that your letter was received.

    6) Be patient. Wait for a response. Hopefully you will get one, by your deadline. This can be a frustrating time. Also, demand letters are the first step, and not always productive. Try not to think about the wait too much. During the wait, catch up on your blog reading.

    7) Follow up. If you don’t get a response by the deadline, follow up. You can follow up by sending a concise letter or email and attaching the initial demand letter. Simply stating something to the effect of

    “Dear Vendor: I have not received a response to my letter of December 28. I remain prepared to file a lawsuit. Kindly let me know if you have any response.”

    You know your vendor, so apply the follow up principle according to his or her personality and what you think will be the most effective language. Don’t forget to be polite, though!

    8) Consider your next steps. If you still don’t receive a response, or the response isn’t what you wanted, considering filing a lawsuit or consulting with an attorney. Contact your local small claims office to determine if the amount of damages fits into the jurisdictional cap, which varies by state. In California, for instance, the cap is $10,000, with some exceptions. Other states have caps of $5,000. The information will likely be set forth on the court website.

    If your claim is more than the jurisdictional amount, then it would be advisable to consult with counsel. Although small claims cases are generally informal, and friendly to non-lawyers, non- small claims cases are much more complex.

    You should not hesitate to move forward if you feel you’ve been wronged. There are finite time limitations on causes of action. So, don’t delay in proceeding with whatever course of action you

    As always, you can consult with an attorney. Your case may be too complex for small claims court. And, if you do go to small claims court, the key to winning is having an organized and succinct argument with supporting evidence. A wedding lawyer can help coach you to success.

    Happy weddings!

    Christie Asselin

    Christie Asselin is a sixth year, California licensed, litigation attorney with a background in personal injury and business disputes. In 2012, she began to explore legal issues related to weddings including vendor negotiation, and contract review.  She loves all things weddings and has a personal and deep love of Gwen Stefani’s wedding gown. She also adores Oceana roses, and cathedral-length wedding veils. You may visit her website at: yourweddinglawyer.com.

    Disclaimer: Please note that the information stated above is general legal information, and not legal advice. Please also note that the author is admitted only to the California State Bar, and to no other state. Attorney Advertising. This communication may be considered attorney advertising. Previous results are not a guarantee of future outcome. No Attorney Client Relationship. The use of any content provided in this article and your provision or submission of any information while using this site will not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Ms. Asselin. Please be aware that any information that you provide by reason of your use of this article is not privileged or confidential. The content of this article is provided solely for informational purposes: it is not intended as and does not constitute legal advice. The information contained herein should not be relied upon or used as a substitute for consultation with legal, accounting, tax, career and/or other professional