Posts in the 'wedding advice' Category

BAB Throwback: To See Or Not To See … That Is The Question

Yes, I know. The first look has been a Thing for a few years now, and granted this post was originally published Nov. 12, 2010. However, the debate is still real, y’all.

BAB Throwback to see or not to see that is the question

From the moment you put on THE dress, you’ve been anticipating the look on his face when he sees you at the end of the aisle. You’re going to look so beautiful, and he’s going to be so proud, and happy, and excited to see you. You two are going to be grinning at each other so much you can hardly hear the minister pronounce you married.

It’s tradition, and it’s the way that most brides think that they’re going to see their grooms for the first time. But more and more, I’m watching couples decide to go with another alternative — The First Look.

Here’s how it works: Your photographer usually begins about three hours before the ceremony, starting with shots of you putting on THE dress, make-up, hair … all the “getting ready” stuff. While you’re doing that, your photographer’s second shooter is over with the guys, taking their pictures, and then about an hour or so into it, everyone meets in the middle for pictures of the wedding party and family. And that’s when you see each other for the first time.

Most photographers make it into a special event, at a secluded place where it’s just the two of you. And once they get that special shot of him seeing you for the first time and you two smiling at each other like whoa, you can hang out together and talk, and get to spend some time alone. Even if it’s for 10 or 15 minutes, that’s going to be hard to come by for the rest of the day, trust me. Then you finish photos with the rest of the gang.

Real Wedding: Summer & Peter's Family-Friendly Destination Tahoe Beach Wedding

From Summer & Peter’s Real Wedding. Credit: Lauren Lindley Photography

Practically speaking? It’s a real time saver. Most of your pictures are done before the wedding, which means you can join your guests for the cocktail hour and enjoy those appetizers you’re paying $X per person for. There’s less family wrangling because it’s a little easier to tell everyone to show up early at an appointed place and time rather than try and track them down after the ceremony. If you’re a blubberer and worry about crying your way down the aisle so much that you worry your guests, the first look might be for you. And since you can make that moment between the two of  you special, these are the reasons why brides of mine have done it.

Emotionally speaking? Well … that’s up to you. Not all of my brides want to do a First Look, because that moment walking down the aisle is just too important and vivid for them. I have one bride that won’t talk about the color of her dress in front of her fiance — that’s how excited she is about him seeing her from the end of the aisle. And I’m grinning as I write that, because that love and anticipation is really what that first moment is all about, no matter where and when you choose to do it. Which is just cool, you know?

And if you do want to wait, of course, it’s fine. You make it work like everyone’s always made it work — separate wedding party pics before the ceremony, and then use the cocktail hour for family pics after the ceremony. Have your wedding planner or a friend bring you a sample of cocktails and apps during the photos, and then join your guests at the reception. Like with most wedding things, (and in life, actually), whatever it is that you mind is what matters. I’m not “Team See” or “Team Not See,” I’m team YOU. Either way, I’m probably going to tear up when it happens. Like always.

So, which team are you? When is your intended going to first see you on your wedding day?

See you at the end of the aisle,

 

Ask Heather: Tipping Vendors – Who and How Much?

Screen Shot 2014-08-12 at 6.02.08 PM

Image courtesy of Randy Hershfield

Dear Heather,

I’m reading mixed messages about tipping vendors! Help!

Tiffany

I’d like to know about the vendors as well! Photographer, DJ, baker …

Charlie

Dear Tiffany and Charlie,

I’m of the opinion that the only vendor you truly need to tip is your wedding planner, ideally around 40%.

Okay, just kidding. Well, sort of ;)

Technically, you don’t have to tip any of your vendors, in the same way that tipping waiters, waitresses, baristas, hair dressers, etc, is not required {Eds note: TIP YOUR SERVERS/BARTENDERS at restaurants, damnit. They live on that shit.}. But it’s a really nice thing to do and it helps you to not look like a jerk. One thing to watch out for, though, is whether a tip is already included in your contract. Caterers will often include a gratuity in their fees, so unless they provide truly exceptional service, watch out for tipping twice. Note that “service fee” and “gratuity” are two different entities, though. The former usually goes straight to the company, whereas the latter is distributed among service staff.

There are some folks who maintain that if a person owns their own business, there’s no need to tip them since they’ve already charged what they wanted for their service. As a business owner, I think this is nonsense. The fees I charge are based on how much time I think I will invest in doing a particular event times an hourly rate I think is fair. If I go above and beyond a couple’s expectations, a tip on top of that amount is always appreciated. And I always try to exceed expectations.

With all of this said, there are still no official guidelines. In general, I’d definitely go with 15-20% for your hair stylist and make-up artist. Those are two of the most often tipped pros. If the gratuity is not already included in your catering bill, I’d also go for 20% of your food bill, to be split amongst the catering staff (host, waiters/waitresses, etc). Bartenders also deserve a tip, but if you intend to provide a tip, perhaps you could politely request that they not have a tip jar on the bar, to avoid double-tipping. Other folks to maybe tip include photographer, videographer, transportation, musician/DJ, officiant (often ends up being a donation to their place of worship), and planner. Alas, I cannot tell you exactly what to tip, since every single person tips differently. Give my best friend and me the exact same restaurant bill and we’ll likely tip the waiter a different amount. So, the exact amount is up to you, but if anyone goes above and beyond expectations, they deserve a little something extra.

As you likely are realizing, tipping really adds up! In addition to forking over some cash, another way to show your thanks is with gushing, enthusiastic reviews posted on sites like WeddingWire. If your vendors aren’t listed on any review sites, go ahead and email your appreciative feedback to them and give them permission to post it on their website (social media shout-outs are great, too!). Every review you give one of your vendors increases the odds that the next couple who comes along will hire them. And never underestimate the value of a well-written thank you note with an excellent photo of you and your new spouse. Trust me – vendors will be touched by the gesture. Especially if it’s accompanied by a glowing review. *Ahem.*

Which vendors are you planning to tip? Has the amount you’ll need for tips been a shock to your budget? Let us know in the comments below!

Our Readers Spill What They Wish They Knew On Their Big Day

While I never, ever want someone to regret their wedding day, like many other events in your life, there will be takeaways that you wish you had been able to implement. And, doing what we do here at The Broke-Ass Bride, we try to help — help with shopping, inspiration, tutorials, ideas and, of course, advice. Because we’ve been doing this for a minute (or, you know, since 2008), we know one of our most valuable resources is you, darlings. So, of course, we hollered out on our social media platforms to see what y’all had to offer up to our BABs-to-be.

What's the No. 1 thing you wish you had known before your wedding day

Timing is Everything:

 I wish I’d known just how fast the time would go by! I would have made the ceremony earlier so I could breathe!

- Ashleigh

[I] wish I knew I wouldn’t have time to speak to everyone “naturally”. I wish we had gotten up and walked around to each table during dinner and thanked everyone for coming.

- Tricia

That I really needed a timeline! Because of delays caused by other people, I was an hour late to my own wedding!

- Kimberly

Communication is Key:

I wish I would have known how to better communicate to my husband all of the things he needed to get done, without feeling like I was being a nag. I’d been telling him the whole time, but about three days before the wedding, he totally freaked out about how much he had to accomplish.

- Heather

Family First: 

I wish I’d better planned a moment with my dad before he walked me down the aisle.

- Stacie

Your family will expect certain things of you, but they won’t tell you directly. Make sure you communicate as well and concisely with them as possible to be clear about your intentions, and — especially to family — send thank-you notes. Your friends may be cool with less formality, but your family may not be.

- Christen

Make Good Choices:

Do not serve asparagus at your wedding…your bridesmaids will thank you later…. Lol

- Shane

[I wish I knew] How much actual work goes into the details. I’m not very detail oriented, and without a lot of help, things would have gone bad very quickly. … Realize that weddings make people planning/helping with them crazy, and try not to hold this craziness against them when all is said and done.

- Elizabeth

Remember What It’s All Really About: 

Every day since would be better and more important than the wedding day.

- Tyke

Despite what goes wrong, if you end up married to the person you love at the end of the day, the wedding was a success.

- Elizabeth

What about you, married BABs? Anything to add?

On Marriage: 15 Things I Would Go Back and Tell Myself Before Getting Married

A funny thing tends to happen, even if just momentarily (you know, before you snap back into real life) once that big ol’ sparkler lands on your finger: The party becomes the goal and we forget about what it all really means. I did. So when I read this piece on The Huffington Post and found myself nodding along in agreement, I knew that it might be something worth sharing. Guys, No. 6 is SUPER ESPECIALLY important. Trust me, OK?

On Marriage 15 Things I Would Go Back and Tell Myself Before Getting Married

Some of my children are getting to the age where they are beginning to think about marriage. Of course, I always try to project a few words of wisdom where they seem appropriate without saying too much. Even so, I think that as parents, we almost always say too much. I try to keep it to the point where though I might be irritating, I’m not damaging our relationship. If I could go back and talk to my younger self, I would make sure that I understood 15 different things about getting married.

  1. Marriage, if it’s done right, is for a long time. Make sure you’re doing something that will make you happy for a long time.
  2. Find someone who is accustomed to dealing with the same types of situations you are. If that’s where to go on your next cruise, so be it. If your history has been trying to figure out how to keep the utilities turned on, marry someone who can relate.
  3. As your relationship began to get serious, you were probably amazed that someone so awesome really cared about you. Marry someone who feels just as lucky because you care about them.
  4. Marry someone who believes in being fair. Be wary of those who claim to want things that aren’t very important to them, so they can give up inconsequential things when it comes down to compromising. Don’t expect your spouse to do things you aren’t willing to do and avoid anyone who expects you to do things that they wouldn’t do.
  5. It’s great if you can both get along with each other’s friends and family, but make sure you are both more committed to your own relationship than to other friends and family. (That includes children when and if they come.)
  6. Choose to spend your life with someone that you get along with. Arguments should be infrequent, and even if serious, they need to reach resolutions rather be ignored. You won’t get along with each other better simply because you get married. In fact, you probably won’t get along as well as you did before you got the certificate.

To continue reading the rest of the 15 Things, click on over to HuffPo.

Ask Heather: When’s the Right Time to Say Thank You?

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 6.28.25 PM

Image courtesy of Creature Comforts

Dear Heather,

I just got a notification that a wedding guest pledged a large amount of money towards my honeymoon fund registry. This person is a new friend of my fiance; I’ve only met them once. Do I thank them right away or just send a thank you after the wedding, which is in two months? Is it weird to call them now and thank them? I’m not sure about the “proper” way to go about this. If it were a close family member or close friend, I would feel more comfortable calling them right away to thank them, but I don’t know how to handle this particular situation.

Leia

Dear Leia,

I don’t know of anyone, anywhere, who would object to being thanked for a gift, nor do I think it’s possible to thank someone too soon. If you don’t know them well, though, it might be a little awkward for them to be called by you and thanked profusely. However, I see nothing at all wrong with having your fiance give them a call to say thanks.

Regardless of whether your fiance calls them or not, though, I suggest writing them a lovely thank you note tonight and mailing it as soon as possible. Make sure your fiance contributes to the note, since these are “his” people. This way, they know their contribution was received and appreciated, and you’ll have one fewer thank you to write after the wedding.

For other folks in a similar situation — I’m a huge fan of opening wedding presents as they are received and writing the notes right then. As I pointed out to Leia, it lets the gift givers know that their present was received, and it takes a task off of your to-do list for when you return from your honeymoon. I’m also in the “divide and conquer” camp when it comes to thank yous — if someone is closer to your future spouse than they are to you, hand over the pen. There’s no reason why one person should feel obligated to write every single note.

Did you open your presents the moment you received them? (If not, how could you resist?!) How did you handle the timing of your thank you notes? Let us know in the comments below!

BAB Throwback: Ask Liz: Managing Your Wedding Expectations & Owning The Wedding You Can Afford

Got a question for our wedding planning guru Heather? Go to the Contact page and let us know what’s up!

BAB Throwback: Ask Liz: Managing Your Wedding Expectations & Owning The Wedding You Can Afford

 

Via.

Dear Liz,

I really like the idea of asking a friend to be a stage manager for the wedding, or possibly hiring a professional as a day-of coordinator. The venue where we’re getting married has their person, who is the one managing both the catering and the venue logistics.  She said she wouldn’t recommend bringing a planner in, since they tend to be grumpy,  and she’s got it covered. Should I just trust that she’ll do what we want?  We have a meeting well ahead of the rehearsal to discuss exact timing for the ceremony, for example, and her staff will even set up all the centerpieces and escort cards if we leave them there. Or, should I risk stepping on her toes and bring in someone who’s just focused on us? Am I worrying too much, or should I just appreciate the level of service the venue is offering?

Signed, 

Day-of Dilemma

Dear Dilemma,

I’ve worked a few weddings where after a couple of meetings I kind of think, “Okay, well, why am I here?” And the answer is “insurance.”  Having someone there who, as you say, is just there for you, and be your advocate in case the things you’re really worried about (whatever those are) go wonky. You don’t want to worry about anything, you want to enjoy the day, and you feel that having her there will make that happen. From your venue manager’s perspective, however, that’s great as long as they aren’t going to question her at every turn or try and fix a system that’s not broken.  This is probably what she meant by the word “grumpy”! So, be very clear with your friend – if you do decide to “hire” her – as to what her responsibilities should be. I’d focus on three things: Vendor management on the day of, bridal and wedding party wrangling, and break-down – what needs to get tossed, sent back to whatever company it came from, or carried away by friends and family. That’s always a scramble at the end of the night, especially if you have a deadline to get out of the space. But, most of all, make sure she asks the venue coordinator how she can facilitate what is already being done. How can she help them help you?  That’s the way that everyone wins.

Dear Liz,

How do you manage inviting groups of people like colleagues, sports groups, etc, when some are close friends but you don’t really care about inviting some other members (and much less their partners who you’ve only met once and were incredibly rude)? How do you compromise between keeping an intimate atmosphere at your wedding and not ruining your life at work afterward?

Signed, 

Picking Teams

Dear Teams,

If you really, truly do not want someone at your wedding, do not invite them. It’s your wedding, you don’t have to make any excuses before or after, and you may be worried about expectations that they don’t even have. “If I invite one member of the soccer team, I have to invite them all.” No, you really don’t. For the most part, people know where they stand with you. But, if you feel that in your particular circumstance, it’s going to cause problems for you that you just don’t want to deal with, then you have to change the way you look at it: You invited them because you “had” to, but you don’t have to hang out with them all night. Like relatives you haven’t seen since you were 12, you can stick them in the corner, go by and say Hi at some point, and enjoy the rest of your wedding. But seriously, if you are going to resent that they are there at all, and that’s going to color how you feel about them on either side of your wedding day, DO NOT INVITE THEM. Now is the time to be honest with yourself.

Dear Liz,

My in-laws expect a very traditional wedding and with our current financial situation, we are in no place to pay for it. I’ve had to cut corners here and there to stay respectful, and also to keep up proper etiquette. Do you have any words of wisdom for dealing with pushy in-laws who refuse to offer any help or monetary contributions, just endless criticism?

Signed, 

A Pain in the MIL

Dear Pain,

Own your wedding: “I love what we have planned, this is the wedding that I want.” “But you need to have a four-tiered wedding cake! “No, I want cupcakes instead, and I love the ones from this bakery. This is exactly what I want.” And then, change the subject to something non-wedding related, or get away from them. You love your wedding, you love everything you have planned. “How could you like this?” “This is what I like.” Smile while you’re saying it. If they get belligerent, “I understand how you feel about it, but I don’t want that, this is what we’re doing, and I love it.”  Do NOT apologize, do not let the words “I’m sorry” cross your lips.  It makes you sound guilty, and you have nothing to feel guilty about. Do not say, “Well, it’s all we can afford,” because that could put them on defense and then you’ll never get rid of them ! Affirm what you’re doing, that you’re doing what you want, and then get the hell out of dodge.

How did you decide who to invite from your office? Are the parental units giving you a hard time about your wedding choices? Let us know (and feel free to vent your own wedding woes) in the comments below! And, if you’d like to find out a little more about me and my part of wedding world, go to www.silvercharmevents.com.

See you at the end of the aisle,

Real Bride Peach: How to be a Zen Master Bride

In speaking with a fellow bride this week (on Twitter message at close to midnight, natch), she stated, “I know you’re like Zen Master Bride, but if you need someone to hear you say unproportionally angry things, I’m here.”

Wait, what? Me? Zen Master Bride?

BWHAHAHA.

How sweet of her! But that simple message led me to ponder over why I’d be perceived as such, when it sure as hell feels like nothing I’m doing or feeling as a Bride is “Zen”.  Here’s my short and sweet advice.

Zen Bride, Broke-Ass Bride, Real Bride Peach, Bride on a Budget,

 

Made with PicMonkey

1. Don’t freak out.

I know. Seems impossible. But remaining calm and keeping a tight reign on my notorious temper has been key for me. I do whatever possible to alleviate stress in my off time, be it relaxing, reading or running and yoga. Because if the Bride ain’t happy, nobody happy. As for emotionally, I try really, REALLY hard to not take questions or comments or jabs personally. It is so difficult to do, especially for a people-pleaser like me. But realizing that these thoughts are (mostly) coming from a place of love has been invaluable. Yes, there will be drama and disappointment and stress. Just trust me when I say that rolling with the punches is far easier than exhausting yourself with a meltdown or engaging in a bloodbath.

2.  Remember your Wedding Vision.

Stick with your vision, no matter what. Now, if your vision is to have a 3-day mandatory camping excursion with 150 people in tents out in the great beyond (no kidding, this has happened in real life), you may want to rethink your ideas. Your guests will thank you for not being required to hover-pee over poison oak in the forest. But in my case, even pre-engagement, my fiance and I dreamed of a simple, intimate garden wedding in front of our nearest and dearest followed by a rockin’ meal and music. 10 months later? That’s still the forefront of our wedding in October. And by NOT getting distracted by the pressure, the Pinterest temptations or the glitz and glam of the industry, we were able to stay focused throughout all the planning on *our* vision. Is it easy? Hardly. But it’s worth it.

3. Pick your battles.

This, my friends. THIS. In the epic world of planning a wedding, there will be many battles. It is your choice entirely as to which ones you meet head-on.  If someone wants to mess with your dreamy garden wedding vision and insists that you have a destination wedding in Cabo or a cathedral church wedding, well, you have my permission to squash those ideas with a quickness. (Nicely, of course.) But when it comes to the smaller nuances, use your logical and deductive skills to decide whether or not to kick up a fuss or to roll with the curveball. Everyone is different and every wedding is different, but in the end, relinquishing *some* of your bridal control can actually be a good thing.

*And pro tip from me? If someone is insisting on adding something that will either 1. impact your budget or 2. cause you added stress and lost time or 3. both, you have every right to state that you’d be happy to think about it but that you cannot incur the costs of their idea and they will need to help with the execution.  The majority of the time, their tune will change most quickly. If not, and they are willing to pitch in AND you actually do like their idea, then let them run like the wind with it. Then you can keep doing you.

4. Let it out.

Please, please, please remember that you are human. Feelings of frustration, anger, sadness, stress are normal. If you keep it all inside, you’ll not only be miserable … you’ll also be dangerous to anyone within a 10-mile radius. This is when having trusted friends who know you, love you and can bear your pain are priceless. In private with them, let it out. (“In private” is critical. Do NOT go apeshit on your Aunt Milda.) Your friends should act as your Vault. With them, wail, scream, cry, whatever you have to do. Follow it up with a glass (or 2) of wine and a good night’s sleep and you’ll feel far better the next day.

So am I totally Zen? Hardly. But these lil’ nuggets of wisdom have helped keep me relatively on an even keel. And I hope they can help you remain as Zen as any betrothed person can be. :)

‘Til next time,

 

 

Ask Heather: Toast Etiquette

ask heather.jpg

Flutes from Beau-Coup, Made with PicMonkey

Dear Heather,

The next thing on my list of things to do for the big day is make a list of people giving toasts. But it feels awkward to ask people to toast to you, right? I’m uncomfortable asking. But then again — the last wedding I went to as a bridesmaid, I wasn’t asked ahead of time to give a speech. But at the rehearsal dinner, the bride’s father got up and asked why none of the bridesmaids were giving speeches. Shocked, I gave a speech that wasn’t great and that I felt guilted into. How do I go about giving my toasters-to-be some peace of mind without feeling vain? Thanks so much!

Virginia Bride

Dear Virginia,

Toasts differ a bit between the rehearsal dinner and the wedding reception. At the rehearsal dinner, it’s much more open-ended in regards to who gives a toast. Traditionally, the groom’s family pays for the rehearsal dinner, so the toasts start off with the groom’s father and can progress to include basically anyone who wants to give a toast, from the parents of the bride to the Best Man to anybody else in attendance. These toasts can be longer and a bit less formal than what you’d expect at the wedding reception. If you foresee an awkward encounter like you experienced, I’d give at least your Best Man and Maid of Honor a heads up. Or, if you aren’t comfortable with that, be prepared to take the toast reigns yourself and graciously thank your guests for attending the rehearsal, thereby avoiding any, “Why isn’t so-and-so toasting?” inquisitions.

As far as the wedding reception, the only person who is absolutely, truly, 100% expected to give a toast is the Best Man, and you have to make sure he’s prepared to give one. In addition to him, the Maid of Honor, parents of the bride, parents of the groom, and the couple themselves can also end up giving a toast. The big thing — make sure people know that they’ll be giving a toast.

For the Best Man, he simply needs to be told, “Hey, part of being the Best Man is giving the first toast of the reception. So, please make sure you have something prepared. And if you’re totally and completely uncomfortable doing this, tell us now so we can devise another plan.” This Other Plan can involve skipping him and going directly to the Maid of Honor, but it’s really unusual for the Best Man to not say anything at the reception.

For everyone else, I’d just ask them if they’d like to do a toast. If so, make sure they’re on the schedule and that they know their toast should be brief. And if you feel awkward asking people about this, think of it this way: This is their opportunity to help celebrate your brand new marriage! Anyone you ask will likely be honored to do so. Plus, it’ll mean that no one ends up getting put on the spot.

How are you handling toasts at your wedding? Will it be just the Best Man, or are you handing the microphone around a bit? Let us know in the comments below!

BAB Throwback: What Not To Wear – Wedding Guest Fashion

As a wedding guest, the dress code has a tendency to be tricky. You want to read between the lines and give it your best go without having to consult a fellow nuptial-goer for fashion advice, but sometimes it can just be plain confusing. BAB tackled this issue way back in 2011 and while there seems to be a bit less rigidity these days (can guest wear white if the bride is wearing pink? Martha says yes.), many of the old tropes still apply. So here’s a refresher from the Broke-Ass archives!

I’m switching gears a bit this week to discuss something that comes up over and over on wedding forums and blogs — what to wear as a wedding guest.

Wedding Guest Fashion: What Not to WearSource

Nowadays, finding something to wear as a wedding guest is almost as stressful as finding your own wedding dress! There are so many etiquette rules, so many stipulations and so many vague dress codes (“festive casual?” “dressy resort?”) that it seems that guests can never figure out which fashions are appropriate for someone else’s wedding.

There are no hard and fast rules, but I’ve been to a lot of weddings and I’ve gotten a feel for these things. So, here is my advice for what a women should and should not wear as a wedding guest.

DON’T wear white or ivory. It wouldn’t bother me personally, but it’s frowned upon in general, and some brides get so upset that they actually ask women wearing white to leave the wedding. As ridiculous as that may sound, it’s better to avoid the situation altogether. There are a ton of other colors out there — choose one of them!

DO dress for the venue. If the wedding is on a lawn or on the beach, those strappy jeweled stilettos might not be the best idea. You might want to consider flats, kitten heels or wedges instead. Or if the wedding is in a fancy hotel ballroom, you might not want to wear a casual sundress with flip flops.

DON’T wear the same exact color as the bridal party, at least not intentionally.

DO dress comfortably. I think that anyone who subscribes to the “fashion before function” philosophy is glutton for punishment! You’re going to be wearing this outfit for several hours — why would you want to suffer in a dress that’s too tight or shoes that pinch? Nowadays, it’s easy to find clothes and shoes that are stylish and comfy!

DON’T wear anything that’s too flashy and/or revealing. This is a wedding, not a nightclub. The bride’s great-aunt has no desire to see your butt cleavage. Trust me.

DO keep in mind that some houses of worship have dress codes. For example, one is not supposed have bare shoulders in a Jewish synagogue. If you’re unsure about ceremony dress codes, feel free to ask the bride, groom or their families. And you could always bring a wrap or pashmina with you just in case.

DON’T dress for the wrong time of day. A slinky LBD would be inappropriate for daytime, and a pastel floral sundress wouldn’t quite work for evening.

DO remember that if you have to ask “Is this appropriate?” it probably isn’t. But also remember that even if you make a screaming fashion faux pas as a guest, it’s not the end of the world. All eyes will be on the bride, not you!

What rules do you follow when dressing for a wedding?

-Dana F.