Posts in the 'Silver Charm Events' Category

How to Swing Your Destination Wedding

06_Christen-Leigh-Wedding-Portraits-005

Photo: Persimmon Images

Almost half of my wedding calendar this year involves couples who are coming from far and farther to get married in Los Angeles. I looked up, and all of a sudden destination weddings are one of my things. Here’s three tips to help you feel confident about making it one of yours, too:

Find your Savvy Local

You know, the person that lives in your wedding city, works there and can be your resource on how to get things done. Try and find a professional, too. Your best friend from college might know how long it takes to get to the beach from your hotel, but they probably won’t know if you need a permit to get married there, or if you have to pay for parking. That sort of thing. If you don’t have a wedding planner, make your venue manager, your hotel manager, your officiant, or your caterer your new best friend. Mostly you’re looking for leads, and potential roadblocks to avoid. If you’re worried about bugging them beyond what you’re paying them, spread the questions around. And, follow up every question with one last question, “Is there anything else I need to know?”

Keep it Simple

Just … Keep it simple. The less moving parts that are involved, the less there is to drive you crazy. One location, two if a meal is involved. No more than 45 minutes to get from point A to Point B at any time. If something requires more than three steps to get done, give it two days instead of one, or turn it into two steps instead of three. And if you are going to remember one thing, remember this: Nothing is going to take less time to do. If anything, since you’re dealing with so much unfamiliarity, in an unfamiliar place, it’s going to take more.

Practice Patience

… Because the last sentence above is where the frustration is gonna come in. You’re hundreds or thousands of miles away. You’ve got to think about time zones, and fitting all of this into your already busy life. You have to ask the right questions, or ask enough wrong ones until you figure out what the right ones are. You’re not there, and you feel like you’re flying blind. There are a lot of details, and a not-so short learning curve, so be patient with yourself, with what you can do from where you are. Be patient with the process. Be patient with everyone you have to deal with during the process. It doesn’t all have to be done quickly, it just has to get done. Look forward to it being done, and having a wonderful day, okay?

In the meantime, while I’m here, do you have any questions about your destination wedding? Let me know in the comments below, and we’ll figure it out. And, if you’d like to find out more about me and my part of Wedding World, come find me at www.silvercharmevents.com.

See you at the end of the aisle,

Liz

Mind Your Own Wedding and Put Down the Gavel

03_Christen-Leigh-Getting-Ready-024

Credit: Persimmon Images 

Hmmm …We’re beginning to notice something lately. And as the most adultish-adult around here (at least age-wise), I’ve been picked to say something about it:
The little, sniping, judgy being made about other people’s wedding choices.
Knock it off. It’s unbecoming. And honestly, it’s not making you feel any better about yourself or your wedding, right? Tearing someone else down doesn’t build you up.

Look, We All Do It.

Someone walks by you wearing, whatthehellisthat?? What, did they go out looking like that? Aren’t they afraid of what other people are going to think? I would NEVER wear anything like that. Hell, television dramas are built for that type of judgement. But it would never occur to you (I hope) to walk up to that person and tell them to go home and change. Or go into the multiple ways that they look a hot mess. Or explain to them that you would never go out in public like that. But it’s okay on the Internet? “Anonymous” doesn’t exist on the Internet. One real person just told another real person that their centerpiece looks tacky. Just because you’re hiding behind a user name doesn’t mean you — yourself — aren’t still being rude. And everyone has just seen you — yourself — be rude and not nice. So, there’s that.

Run Your Own Race

You have made decisions and choices that you are proud of. Be proud of them. Celebrate them, which you can do without attacking someone else’s decisions and choices. There is no “best” way to do anything, there’s just what’s best for you. And especially if you’re talking about weddings, which is all about style, and how you — yourself — feel about how something looks (we’re talking about the wedding, not the marriage part), then you can’t judge other people on that. It’s as pointless as questioning someone’s music taste. You would never listen to Taylor Swift. Okay, then keep doing that and live your life, and leave the Tayhards alone.

A wedding is not a pie-baking contest. Again, there are no better or best decisions — no universal consensus is available on table settings, or whatever. There are just the choices you’ve made and are going to make, that are going to build the wedding day that you want and have dreamed of. And that in no way depends on the choices some other bride has made. It doesn’t diminish your choice, just as your choices don’t diminish hers. They have nothing to do with one another.

Do Not Judge Lest You Be Judged

Which is probably already happening on some level. Your parents aren’t totally on board with some piece of your wedding. The caterer or the venue is — or is going to — have an issue with something you want to bring in or do. You worry about what your guests will think. The feeling of being judged, pretty much sucks, doesn’t it? Don’t perpetuate that on another person.

Plus, you don’t — and will never — know what their circumstances are. Not just budgetary concerns, but maybe there are other reasons as well. Maybe they won’t have the time to hand calligrapher their place cards. Or maybe their fiance has vetoed an arch at the end of the aisle, or they’ve found a solution they both like better. Maybe they just like daisies, which is not illegal. At least, not yet. It’s a universal truth, but it’s still the truth — until you walk a mile in someone else’s shoes, you don’t know why they’re walking or what they’re walking to in the first place. Just as they don’t know anything about you, or your life, or why you’re doing what you’re doing. Don’t make assumptions, especially the assumption that they don’t know what they’re doing, and need to be told so. You would hate it if that spotlight was turned on you, and you had to explain all of your choices. It’s not anyone’s business, so let’s keep it that way.

The Insecurity Thing

That’s another thing I’ve personally noticed, when I find myself being judgy. It feels like I’m judging this other person, but what I’m actually doing is judging myself for the choices (professional, personal, what have you) that I’ve made or haven’t made. Because we’re not always sure, are we? And that’s just being human. But, if you’re finding yourself questioning someone else, think about what you could be questioning of yourself. If you’re not sure about what you’re doing, remember you have both the time and resources to change it. What’s wrong and what needs to get fixed, in your opinion? Figure out what you need in order to feel better about your wedding? All of us are always around to help you get there. But leave everyone else’s weddings alone.

So, when was the last time you made a judgement call about someone else’s wedding, or felt the cold eye of judgement upon yours? Let us know how you handled that in the comments below.

See you at the end of the aisle,

Liz

Keep Your Wedding Balances in Balance

Real Wedding: Summer & Peter's Family-Friendly Destination Tahoe Beach Wedding

Photo: Lauren Lindley Photography

You know it — your wedding money is being thrown around fast and furious. Hundreds, thousands of dollars. Tens of thousands of dollars. Not all at once, mostly. But the word “eventually” looms closer every day.
So, what I’m trying to say is this post isn’t so much about budgeting as it is about stress relief. And a lot that means getting ahead of the stress in the first place.

Do This One Thing

Put all your payment due dates, with the current estimated cost in whatever calendar you look at the most — the one in your phone, the one on your wall, the one in your wedding notebook. Do it right now. Set or write an alert for a week or a couple of days ahead of time, whatever works for your schedule or will work with your bank account. Not so far ahead that it’s easy to forget (like a month before) but close enough so that you have enough time to pull together the funds, if you need to. You know how you are, so proceed accordingly. Bonus points for noting the method of payment, too.

Do This Other Thing

Any payment you can automate, do it. I take automated payments from my couples, and odds are your venue, you photographer and most of your other vendors do, too. Combining it with your alerts will keep you on track, or give you time to change tracks (or credit cards) if you need to. Also, Venmo is a great way to pay vendors quickly and easily right from your phone. It’s the app of life, y’all.

Have This One Place

So, you’ve taken care of the wedding payment trees, don’t ignore the forest that’s your wedding budget! Have one place — an Excel sheet, a Google Doc spreadsheet, heck, a Word document — where you list the total cost of all this stuff! One place where it’s all accounted for, all added up and where you always know what you’re spending and what you’ve spent. When you can see the big picture, you’re setting yourself up to make the best choices, and take many, many deep breaths of relief.

So, what’s your calendar of choice? Do you have any questions about automatic payments or wedding budgets? Let me know in the comments below. And if you would like to find out more about me and my part of Wedding World, go to www.silvercharmevents.com.

See you at the end of the aisle,

Liz

Your Grown-Up Wedding

Venue

Credit:  Lucky Photographer

The first step to having a grown-up wedding is acknowledging that you’re a grown-up. And that your guests and family are grown-ups. Marriage is the second most grown-up thing you can do. So, you might as well start now with the day that’s going to start it all off. In the immortal words of Monica Geller, “It sucks, you’re going to love it.”

You’re saying Yes … to Everything.

Your wedding is not something that’s happening to you. From the cost, to the menu, to the dress, to the guest list, to the decorations. With a shrug, with a frown, with an enthusiastic clapping of hands. You opted in. It’s a big day, and a big undertaking and it’s easy to do it now and resent the hell out of it later. So, remember:

You can say No … to Anything.

Easy to write, not so easy to do. I get yelled at a lot for this one. “I can’t say no to my parents [insert this thing they really want here], it’s impossible.” Nothing is impossible, but yes, some things are hard. You don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings, you’re afraid you’re going to sound like a rude jerk. We covered this a little last week. Most people are not great at conflict, whether they are used to it or not. Be clear that you don’t want it, thank them for the suggestion, if there is an alternative that you like, hype it. Don’t be defensive, smile, change the subject. Works, I swear.

Your Guests are Adults. They Are Also Human Beings in Your Spotlight.

It’s mostly you on stage, but it’s not just you. Everyone wants to get it right, so everyone can enjoy the day. Back your guests up where you can — directional signs, someone standing by to help them find their place card. They do need to know where the restrooms are, they don’t have to be assigned a particular seat at a particular table. No one is going to freak out if you’re serving Coors Light and $5 wine instead of their choice of martini cocktails. Don’t think babysitting, just think “flow.” You cannot please everyone, but you can make it easier for them to enjoy themselves. What would you want if you were a guest? What would need? Make sure that’s covered.

Get Clear About Your Wedding Responsibilities

What goes into your wedding day must come out. When? Someone has to do it, and if it’s not you, then who? What are you allowed to do, and what are you not? Hint: If it has to be stuck on anything, sprinkled, lit or hung, ask first. How long do you have your vendors? When do they need to get paid? What do they need from you to do their job? Don’t assume they will stay later than asked and not get paid for that, or come earlier, or bring more equipment. Don’t make the day harder for them, because it’s going to end up being harder for you. That’s not going to be a good day.

Fly Casual

You have a destination — your big fun, love- and joy-infused wedding day — and you are on your way. You have to give it some time, but you’re going to get there. You don’t have to worry about whether you’re doing it, because you’re doing it. There are plenty of maps and resources to help you. Course corrections can be made — they are not the end of the world or evidence that you are a crappy pilot. And when you get there, ENJOY THE DAY. That’s an order. It’s what adults do. And in the meantime, go easy on yourself, I can guarantee you’re doing a lot better than you think you are.

So, how are you taking a deep breath and putting on the big girl pants when it comes to your wedding? What do you think of my advice? Let me know in the comments below! And if you would like to learn a little more about me and and my part of Wedding World, come visit me at www.silvercharmevents.com.

See you at the end of the aisle,

Liz

Your Family vs. Your Guest List

Lili_Ben-27

Credit: Life’s Highlights

Last week, I got an email from a bride who didn’t have a problem yet, but was anticipating a huge one. She and her fiance want a small wedding, surrounded by their good friends and close family. She was pretty sure that wasn’t going to happen once her mother got ahold of the list. What if her Mom insisted on inviting the 120 family members that she would probably want to add to that list? There’s a ton of you worried about the same thing. I know there’s a few (unnamed) couples on my roster who are, for sure.

So, how to combat that? For starters, stop thinking about it as a battle. It’s a wedding, its not a war. And if you keep looking at everything as a potential conflict, that’s exactly what you’ll find. I’m not so zen that I’m saying the guest list won’t be an issue. I…have parents, too. And what I (eventually) figured out was that it’s easier if you manage their expectations of your expectations. You’re not going to be able to avoid the conversation with them, but you can certainly put it into context.

Get specific with your numbers

Sit down with your fiance and make a list of everyone the two of you want to invite. It won’t take long, but go over it a couple more times to make sure you didn’t miss anyone, and that you included their significant others. Now, given that list, how many more people are you willing to have at your wedding? So, say you come up with a list of 50 people, or 25 couples. Are you willing to have another 50 people at your wedding, to bring it to 100? Another 25 people to bring it to 75? Think about it as people, and think about it as tables. 50 people is five tables, 100 people is 10. What feels right to you?

Mom?

Be straightforward, and tell the truth: “We want to keep the guest list to 100 people, and we have 50 people that we want to invite. Can you help us and give us a list of the 50 people you want to invite by [make up a date in the next couple of weeks]?” This is what we want, this is what we have so far, this is what we’re asking from you and here’s the date we need it by. We really appreciate your help! DO NOT under any circumstances, apologize. You’re not being mean, you’re not being rude, DO NOT get defensive. Just state what you want, which is a wedding with this number of people. Ask for their help. And then change the subject as quick as you can. Check in a couple of times before your deadline. Be prepared to have the conversation again. Express gratitude for their help as often as you can.

Bonus points: Get specific with the costs

For extra credit, if you’ve already booked a venue and/or caterer, figure out out how much it is going to cost per person and for the entire group, and give that to her, too. So, say, your venue is $2500. if catering is $75 per person, plus tax and service (30% here) = $97.50 per person, or $14,750 for 100 people. See? You’re trying to be reasonable by sticking to a reasonable budget, whether they’re paying for it or you are.

They’ll be thinking about those numbers while they’re going over their own list. And, again, Do NOT apologize! No, “I’m really sorry about this.” For one thing, that’s a lie. For another, you’re not doing anything wrong. Ask her for help. Thank her for her help. Take a deep breath, and smile.

So, really, how many of you are facing a massive guest list from your folks that you don’t want? Got any questions about my advice? Let me know in the comments below!

See you at the end of the aisle,

Liz

Wedding Tech vs. Your Wedding Guests

Wedding Tech vs. Your Wedding Guests

Obviously, technology plays a huge part in our lives, but there’s a lot of corners you can find yourself banging into when it comes to tech in Wedding World.

Look, first it started with personal wedding websites and online gift registries. Then e-vites and e-RSVPs and cute apps that keep your guests and your wedding party constantly updated on your plans for the Big Day. You know, if they download the app.

It can never be enough, it seems, but it can also be too much. Because your pursuit of a perfectly efficient, streamlined, green wedding planning experience, will, somewhere along the way, fall victim to human nature.

The Tech That is Good

Wedding websites. One stop shop for additional information, which is just the best. Sign up on The Knot, Wedding Wire, Wedding Paper Divas or one of a dozen other sites, put it somewhere on your invite. Done.

Evites. The popular thought is still that you either have to send out paper invites or you have to send out both, but I’m not sure. I think that’s more of an expectation thing — you expect your grandmother (last seen checking email on her Kindle) won’t be able to open up an email, or will be offended that she has to. We’ve been working with this internet thing for over 20 years, now. Might be time to save a little money, a little paper and give everyone the benefit of the doubt.

Online registries. Listed, hopefully on your wedding website. Ready to ship your wedding gifts to the house of your choice. For the most part, it prevents guests from having to bring gifts to your wedding, which you then have to lug to the house of your choice. For the most part.

When you’re looking for good Wed Tech, again, think “one-stop shopping.” The wedding website or e-vite that can track your RSVPs, that can tell your guests, with a click, where to buy your gifts and where to stay. Don’t drive yourself or your guests nuts trying to find the right information in a combination of seven different places.

The Tech That is Not So Great

Wedding apps. You can build a wedding app that takes the place of a wedding website. An app that stores/sends any pictures guests take at your wedding. The aforementioned app that keeps everyone informed on your planning progress. It’s not that the apps in of themselves are bad, but you’re going to lose most people when you send them to a secondary location (the app website) to get them to the third location (the app), and expecting everyone to download it, and then remember to use it. I checked — I have 120 apps on my phone. I use seven, maybe, on a daily or weekly basis. How about you? And before you think, “well, I can set up a notification system for updates”?

Just … No. Don’t spam your guests.

That’s a good rule for any Wed Tech you use. Don’t spam. Universal truth: No one cares about your wedding as much as you do. No one is as invested as you are, and it would be a little weird if they were. Don’t get me wrong, they care about you. They care about whether or not they can be there, and about doing the right thing when they get there. So, give them a place to go to get that information. But don’t worry that they have to know about every little change when it changes. Everyone’s grown. For the most part. Which brings us to …

The Tech That Will Not Work As Well As You Want It To

Manage your expectations:

Online RSVPs. It does not matter what you do, you will not get a 100% RSVP by your deadline. The human nature thing. People procrastinate, people aren’t sure if they can come when the deadline hits, people forget. Or they assume that you know that they’re coming, or that you know they’re not. Whatever the reason, you will have hunt the RSVP AWOLs down. Be proactive: Set up a spreadsheet with everyone’s names, phone numbers and email address and avoid scrambling. Scrambling sucks.

Online registries will not prevent some guests from physically bringing their gift to your wedding. Many guests will also bring envelopes with checks and cash. Have a place where those can go when they get there, and a plan for how to get them out.

So, seriously, is it time to go full green and make e-vites the new norm? What tech are you using for your wedding?

Let me know in the comments below. And if you’d like to find out more about me and my part of Wedding World, go to www.silvercharmevents.com.

See you at the end of the aisle,

Liz

Wedding Photography: The Unknown Unknowns

Wedding Photography: The Unknown Unknowns

Photo: Chasing Glimpses

Weddings are complicated creatures. There are a  there a lot of things about your wedding  that you can extrapolate from real life, and a lot of that you can find out by asking obvious questions. But there are also the unknown unknowns, the stuff that you don’t know that you don’t know.  And you don’t — or wouldn’t — know, because you haven’t done this before.

As a wedding planner, finding your photographer is always the next thing on our checklist, after your venue and a caterer. For one thing, it’s usually the next most expensive line item on your budget. Your wedding pictures are the only permanent thing, other than your spouse and your ring, that you’re taking away from your wedding day! But wedding photography  is filled with unknown unknowns. What is that you don’t know that you don’t know about your wedding photography?

Choosing a Good Photographer

 Like most art forms, “good photography” is subjective. So, first of all, look for pictures and styles that personally appeal to you. Look for pictures that are focused, whose subjects are are well-lit, against backgrounds that don’t distract from the photograph.

There are also no standard costs for photography, though here in Los Angeles, you can expect to throw back a few thousand dollars.  When you’re deciding between photographers that you like, try and compare apples and apples. What services do they each provide, what are you getting for what you’re paying? How many hours on site? Are engagement pictures included? An album? A disk of pictures? And if one photographer doesn’t offer one apple that another does, ask how much it would be to add it. Either way, you’ll be able to find a great photographer in your price range. But don’t settle — sign that contract knowing that your pictures are going to be beautiful.

And, seriously? Choose a photographer that you like. They are going to literally be in your face all day during your wedding and you’ll be dealing with them after the wedding while they’re finishing your pictures and albums. You need to be okay with that.

How Much Time and Work is Invested in Your Pictures

There’s the lead-up to your wedding, the consultations about what pictures you want, the ones you don’t and discussing (several times) the general flow of the day. Engagement pictures usually take 2-3 hours. They are at your wedding for 8-12 hours. If you don’t have a planner, they’re going to be running the day with help from your DJ. And, depending on your venue and your guest count, there could be two photographers. And, no kidding, those photographers are going to take thousands of pictures. So, after your wedding, thousands pictures have to be sorted in chronological order, duplicates and blurry shots have to be deleted, and the rest have to be edited and touched up before you even see them. Raw images are not an option you want. So, it takes a few weeks! And, how fast you get your album after that depends on you and how fast you can pick the pictures you want in it.

About Those Pictures On Your Wedding Day …

As you’ve probably figured out if you’ve been reading for a while, I’m into wedding timing. How to manage it, when to ignore it, and when to pay very, very close attention to it. Pictures take a lot of time. Assembling everyone, for one. Posing. Posing again. Different locations, different shots. Groomsmen wander back to the bar, other people blink during group shots. This can eat up the time you have between hair and makeup and leaving for your venue, and it can definitely make your cocktail hour hectic! You don’t have to do it (you don’t have to do anything) but talk to your photographer about taking pictures of you and your fiance before the wedding, and getting as many group shots as you can after that. Less pictures during the cocktail hour, more of a chance for an appetizer and a drink, and to marvel in wonder that, WOW, you just got married! Ask your photographer about other ways to streamline the day. Trust me, they’ll have a ton of suggestions.

Are starting to look for photographers? And if you’ve already picked yours, how many did you talk to before you made a decision? Have you decided to do a first look? Let me know, along with any questions, in the comments below!

And if you would like to find out more about me, and my little part of Wedding World, go to www.silvercharmevents.com.

Liz

Cool Wedding-y Shizz Around the Web

How about a schmancy Valentine’s date in? Every Last Detail has some great inspiration on having a romantic dinner in your back yard with your love.

For bridesmaid dresses on a budget and in every color of the rainbow, head over to Kiss My Tulle.

Kiss My Tulle - Rainbow of Affordable Bridesmaid Dresses

Potted succulents are a wonderful wedding favor — especially for those friends of yours stricken with brown thumb syndrome. Brenda’s Wedding Blog has a great succulent favor DIY.

Going nautical with your nuptials? Make mini vintage sailboats for your centerpieces or as favors, courtesy of Tidewater and Tulle.

Key necklaces have been popular for years, but they get a great modern twist with glitter, thanks to a glitter skeleton key necklace DIY on Classic Bride Blog.

Wedding flowers are spendy, but Budget Savvy Bride has some great tips on how to save on your wedding florals.

budget-saving-tips-for-flowers_Christopher_Bell-600x900

Photo: Christopher Bell

According to our venerable planning guru Liz Coopersmith of Silver Charm Events, there are two questions you should ALWAYS ask when you start wedding planning.

How to Love Your Wedding

13.1

 

It works better if you love it.

-Danielle La Porte
So, you’re at least a couple of months (or so) into planning your wedding, with a few months (or so) to go. It’s been a bit much, and not quite what you expected. And with so many moving pieces and so many unknown unknowns hiding in the back corners of any choice, it’s easy to start resenting it . The money, the time, the checklists. One of my new brides expressed all of this during our first consult, and I asked her, “Do you love your wedding?” And she said, “Not right now. I love the idea of it. I love what I want it to look like.” Well, that’s a start. “But I don’t really love it,  there’s too much to get through to get there.”

In the quote at the top, Danielle was not talking about weddings, specifically, but if she was, she’d still be right. Planning your wedding works better if you figure out how to love it.

Here are a few ways to start:

Replace the word “overwhelmed” with the sentence “I have a  lot of options.”

It’s the difference between feeling trapped, or feeling like you have choices, because you do. And you have time to go through them, one at a time. Embrace the Pretty. Focus on what you like, instead of what you don’t. And if you have to move on, do it believing what I believe: You will find what you want and need. Because you will.

Replace the word “worry” with “decide.”

Full-stop on the anxiety. A wedding cake isn’t the next thing you have to worry about, it’s just a decision that you have to make … out of the many options that you have. Embrace the Pretty or the Yummy, ask the questions, and trust yourself to ultimately make the right decision.  Because you will.

Replace the word “dread” with “anticipate.”

This is the huge one. And tough, I know. So many things haven’t worked out, it’s hard to take a deep breath and walk through another door hoping for the best. Meet it halfway — hope to see something cool, even if the cool thing ends up being a story about how awful it was! When you’re really at ready to throw something off of something, think about all the people that you can’t wait to see on your wedding day, and all the fun you’ll have, even if the bouquet you wanted is twice as much because peonies aren’t in season. What are you looking forward to on that day? It’s okay if the answer is, “for the planning to be over.” But until then, wait, what did that caterer just say to you??

Replace the word “how” with “when.”

“How am I going to do this?” One Google search and phone call at a time,  like I do. Again, avoid feeling trapped, take back the control and schedule the time to get it done. It could be during lunch, you can shoot a phone call or email out once you get home, but pencil it in. That’s how you do it.

Celebrate everything.

You booked your venue. Awesome. You found three photographers that you can afford whose work you love.  YES. Got through your first bridal shop visit? That calls for at least one margarita break. Found $4 gold chiavari chairs? Brush that dirt off your shoulder, woman. Celebrate each crossed off checkbox, no matter how high up on the list it is. And look for stuff to celebrate. You’d be surprised how quickly that will become a habit. {Eds. Note: We HIGHLY advocate keeping a cheap bottle of bubbly in the fridge at all times during your engagement.}

And most importantly, on your wedding day, CELEBRATE. First of all you made it — because of course you did — but most of all because this is a day that you filled with your choices, that you filled with things that you love, and people that you love. My favorite part of every wedding is watching you have a good time, sometimes despite yourself! Give up, stop worrying and enjoy the day. The love and the fun will all be there waiting for you.

And, there’s your pep talk for the month! What was your last wedding win, and your last wedding frustration? How did you celebrate, or pull yourself out of a funk. Let me know in the comments below!

And if you would like to find out more about me and my part of Wedding World, go to www.silvercharmevents.com.

See you at the end of the aisle,

 

 

Liz