8/23 DIY or DIE: Polymer Clay Geode Candle Holders

Affiliate Disclaimer NewIf you’re anything like me, you’ve been mad crushing on all the gorgeous agate and geode details popping up in wedding and home decor lately. With a little investigation, you probably found that lots of these pieces aim to break your budget super-fast, so that’s why I’m hear to share the fruit of my trial-and-error labors. A word of warning: this project calls for Mod Podge super glossy and that comes with a four-week curing time (!!!), so if your wedding date is fast approaching, get started quickly so you have plenty of drying time!

To get these pretties going, grab a square or rectangular glass candle holder, pick out 4-5 colors of polymer clay from the same color family. You’ll want plenty of contrast with lights and darks. You’ll also need some glossy Mod Podge, a rolling pin (or empty wine bottle!), gold craft paint¬†and a fine paint brush, coarse salt like rock salt or sea salt and a regular metal spoon.

agate geode DIY step oneStart by rolling each of your clay colors into individual snakes. For reference, a 4x4x4 cube takes about 2 1/2 total blocks of clay to cover. Twist all of the cords together into one and roll them into a ball. Let the colors get marbled, but don’t over-mix them. While you can still see the individual colors, roll them out into one flat sheet.

agate geode DIY step two

Wrap your clay sheet around the four sides of the candle holder, pressing the seams down with the back side of the spoon. Seal the top side down, making sure there is no air between the clay and the glass. You can save the extra clay for future projects.

Agate geode DIY step three

Choose a side to add your “crystal” and dig out an organic shape with the tip of your spoon, following the lines created in your clay for the most natural shape. You can see where I had a big spot that over-mixed and created an ugly, muddy color; this is the perfect way to get rid of something you don’t like! As you dig out the clay, make sure to press the edges down to seal it to the glass. Pop your candle holder in the oven according to the clay’s directions (usually about 15 minutes at 275). Your piece will be hot for about an hour, so this is a great time to practice if you’re hoping to make a large batch for your wedding!

agate geode DIY step four

Once your candle holder is cool enough to handle, take the gold paint, and trace around the edges of the hole you made. You can also add gold “veins” along some of the naturally occurring lines in the clay for some added sparkle!

agate geode DIY step 5

Once your gold paint is dry (which should only be a couple minutes), take your spoon and carefully drizzle a little of the Mod Podge into your cavern, but only fill it about half-way up.

agate geode DIY step six

Now we get to make the faux-crystal using salt! I had the most success by using a super-coarse rock salt around the edges, then sprinkling a coarse sea salt throughout and finishing with a more finely ground sea salt to fill in any gaps. Use your fingertip to press the salt into your Mod Podge and if anything still feels loose, you can drizzle more to set it. Once you have the crystal portion created, leave it flat and allow it to dry overnight.

agate geode DIY step seven

Once the crystal portion is sufficiently set, you can finish the entire piece with Mod Podge to give it a polished, shiny look. Just be aware that it takes about four weeks to cure and will need to be stored in a sealed container to keep it from accumulating dust. The best part is, these not only make gorgeous additions to your wedding tablescapes, but beautiful gifts, or even home decor to give you that sweet reminder of one of your best days ever!

agate geode DIY display

Have you tried this DIY? What colors did you use? We’d love to see the results in the comments below!

This DIY was originally posted on Little Wedding Extras and happily shared with BAB readers!